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Mgr Barbara Surdykowska
ORCID: 0000-0003-4569-1274
Barbara Surdykowska works in the Expert Office of the National Commission of NSZZ "Solidarność", where she provides legal support for trade union structures during various negotiations. An expert of the Social Dialogue Council. Author of papers concerning, among others, European social dialogue, negotiations in transnational corporations and the role of trade unions in the European Semester. Her main research interest is the Europeanisation of industrial relations.
DOI: 10.33226/0032-6186.2022.4.3
JEL: J88, K31

The paper deals with the possibility of concerted and joint inspections by the European Labour Authority. Inspections so far have concerned the construction sector, agriculture, and road transport. Concerted and joint inspections are an important part of the ELA's activities and competencies; however, it is open to question how often the social partners and the Member States will make use of this possibility.

Keywords: European Labour Authority; inspections; EU labour market
DOI: 10.33226/0032-6186.2021.12.1
JEL: J24, J83, O33

The article addresses the phenomenon of human cyborgization and its potential impact on the situation of the world of work. It was inspired by the centenary of birth of Stanisław Lem, an outstanding Polish author of science fiction literature, but also a visionary of the future. First, brief comments on the definition of cyborgization and its development in various aspects are presented. Then, the authors try to highlight those issues at the interface between cyborgization and the world of work, which will require analysis in the context of labour law, such as theemployee's right to neurological improvements (and also to refuse to apply them) and the ownership of these improvements in the employer-employee relationship. Next, questions are asked whether cyborg work will not be treated as a commodity and whether the current paradigm of the capitalist economy will force the pursuit of cyborgization of the working man. Finally, the issue of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the acceleration of cyborgization processes is raised. The article contains references to the works of s-f dealing with significant problems resulting from the potential artificial "augmenting" of the human.

Keywords: cyborgization; the world of work; new technologies
DOI: 10.33226/0032-6186.2021.9.3
JEL: J39, J51

One of the issues commonly discussed today is the issue of universal basic income (UBI). The aim of the paper is to bring closer to the ongoing and slowly "flushing" discussion on basic income within the trade union movement. The trade union movement is deeply skeptical of the UBI. The reasons for the trade union movement's concern in the context of the possibility of using basic income as a response to the processes taking place in the labor market related to technological change seem to be as follows: i) the trade union movement seems to prefer the classic "right to work" over the "right to a basic income" due to the fact that performing work effectively integrates people into social life and is the basis for building a path of personal development; ii) trade unions fear that they will completely lose the ability to influence wages through collective bargaining and that wage issue will return to the sphere of individual tender of strength. It can be argued that where trade unions are still strong and have a real impact on the wage structure (for example Belgium or Germany), they are more clearly opposed to the UBI. Where these organizations operate to a greater extent in a highly flexible environment, they are more positive about this idea.

Keywords: universal basic income; trade unions; social policy
DOI: 10.33226/0032-6186.2021.5.3
JEL: K31, K33

The article deals with the jurisprudence of the Supreme Court of Canada regarding the relationship between the right of association and the right to collective bargaining and the right to strike. The paper analyzes such sentences as: BC Health or SFL v Saskatchewan. The article presents the "dialogue" between individual courts and tribunals. In the SFL v Saskatchewan ruling, the Supreme Court of Canada points to a growing international consensus that if the right to collective bargaining to be meaningful, it must include the right to strike. In these considerations the court directly refers to the achievements of the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. The relationship between the jurisprudence of both entities is clear. A clear common base is the output of the quasicase law of the International Labor Organization.

Keywords: : right of association; right to collective negotiation; right to strike; Supreme Court of Canada; quasi-case law of the ILO
DOI: 10.33226/0032-6186.2020.12.1
JEL: J53

In the paper the judgment of the General Court of the European Union of 24 October 2019 on the European sectoral social partners' agreement of 21 December 2015 "General framework for informing and consulting officials and employees of the central government administration" is discussed. The judgment is the result of a complaint by the European Federation of Public Service Trade Unions EPSU. This judgment and the future final ruling by the CJEU (following an appeal by EPSU) will be of key importance for the functioning of the European social dialogue mechanisms. These rulings allow us to pose questions about the role of the European Commission in this process.

Keywords: European social dialogue; European Commission; right to information and consultation
DOI: 10.33226/0032-6186.2020.4.1
JEL: K31

The spreading COVID-19 pandemic is a serious blow to the global economy, including the relatively stable socio-economic structures of developed capitalism. The paper presents the first reactions of institutions and social partners. The authors point out that the pandemic crisis may lead to the fundamental transformation of the world of work as we know it today. In describing the vision of the world of  work after the pandemic, 4 questions asked in the paper may be helpful, regarding: the future of globalization, changes in the work environment, the need to provide social security in a wider scope, and social changes in assessing the value of jobs.

Keywords: COVID-19; working conditions; social security; globalization
DOI: 10.33226/0032-6186.2020.2.2
JEL: K31, K33

The paper discusses the rulings of the CJEU: Egenberger, IR v JQ, Bauer and Max Planck, in which the Court pointed to the direct application of Articles: 21, 31 para. 2 and 47 EU Charter of Fundamental Rights. The author draws attention to the limited significance of this jurisprudence line due to the maintenance of the arguments contained in the AMS ruling, indicating that where there is a reference to "national law and practices" in the Charter's record, such a record makes it impossible to apply the Charter directly. The effect of the case-law pointing to the direct application of the Charter also depends on the number and quality of the questions referred for a preliminary ruling by the courts from a given country.

Keywords: EU Charter of Fundamental Rights; case law of the CJEU; European integration

Barbara Surdykowska works in the Expert Office of the National Commission of NSZZ "Solidarność", where she provides legal support for trade union structures during various negotiations. An expert of the Social Dialogue Council. Author of papers concerning, among others, European social dialogue, negotiations in transnational corporations and the role of trade unions in the European Semester. Her main research interest is the Europeanisation of industrial relations.